Posts filed under ‘Emotional Intelligence’

Video Slideshow: 5 Strategies to Raise Moral, Kind Children

Richard Weissbourd, a psychologist at the Harvard graduate school of education, and the Making Caring Common Project summarize recommendations about how to raise children to become caring, respectful and responsible people.

View on The Washington Post

 

March 13, 2015 at 10:24 am Leave a comment

Naps are Key to Positive Engagement in Toddlers

Sleeping ToddlerA 2012 study from the University of Colorado Boulder confirms what most parents of two to three year-old toddlers instinctively know: missing a daytime nap results in “crankier” kids.   The study showed that, “toddlers between 2 and a half and 3 years old who miss only a single daily nap show more anxiety, less joy and interest and a poorer understanding of how to solve problems, said CU-Boulder Assistant Professor Monique LeBourgeois, who led the study.”

The facial expressions of children in the study were videotaped an hour after taking their regular nap, and on a different day after having missed their nap time.

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January 5, 2012 at 11:35 pm Leave a comment

The Benefits of Family Meal Time

Family MealBeing a parent of an infant or toddler is a wonderful, and yet at times, exhausting role.  It’s tempting to get food prepared for the kids, and worry about yourself later, particularly if you have a picky eater.  However, research shows that families who share most mealtimes together raise kids who are healthier – both physically and emotionally – and who do better in school.   As soon as your baby is eating solid foods, it’s a good idea instill the habit of eating together as a family, particularly given the vocabulary advantages for preschoolers who eat with their parents and siblings.

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October 13, 2010 at 9:46 am Leave a comment

Praising a Child as “Smart” Can Be Detrimental

Smart Girl With BooksWe’ve been told for years that praising our children is a good thing; that it builds self-esteem and confidence.  It’s almost instinctual to applaud a child as smart when they do something clever.  My four year-old just recited the fifty states in alphabetical order (thanks to his nanny’s fondness for the Fifty Nifty United States song) and then proceeded to identify more states than I can on his map puzzle.  So I had to bite my tongue not to say “you’re so smart!” or “your memory is amazing!”  I’m fighting my ingrained habits of praise because a growing body of research is showing that complementing innate talents such as intellect or athletic ability can have a number of negative consequences. (more…)

June 16, 2010 at 9:28 pm Leave a comment

Self-Control and the Link to Academic Success

Marshmallow TestAs parents, we want to do whatever we can to help our children succeed academically, and more importantly, in life.  In fact, there is one teachable skill that is a better predictor of academic performance than IQ.  That skill is self control, and specifically, the ability to redirect attention in order to delay gratification.  In a nut-shell: raw smarts matter, but so do preparation and focus.  Consider the kids who study on the night before a test rather than playing video games.

You may have heard of the “marshmallow test” that laid the foundation for research on delayed gratification.  Dr. Walter Mischel studied four year-olds at Stanford University (more…)

June 14, 2010 at 10:36 pm 2 comments


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